Think Different

“Here’s to the crazy ones. The misfits. The rebels. The troublemakers. The round pegs in the square holes. The ones who see things differently. They’re not fond of rules, and they have no respect for the status quo. You can quote them, disagree with them, glorify and vilify them. About the only thing you can’t do is ignore them because they change things. They push the human race forward. And while some may see them as crazy, we see genius. Because the people who are crazy enough to think they can change the world, are the ones who do.”

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Jim Rogers on the Future

Jim Rogers Interview on being successful, investing in the future, and preparing for civil unrest
His phone number in Alabama was 5.

The Best Business Advice on Donny Deutsch Show From the CEO

Before ending in December 2008, CNBC’s talk show “The Big Idea with Donny Deutsch” welcomed in successful businessmen and women to discuss their histories and philosophies, providing great advice for would-be entrepreneurs across the country. In 2006, Deutsch sat down with CEO of Sketchers Robert Greenberg to discuss what distinguishes successful businesses from unsuccessful ventures. Greenberg’s answer? Persistence. “If you start down any road, there’s always going to be a left or right turn. You just can’t see it from the starting line,” Greenberg says. “Just don’t ever stop trying.”

Seth Godin: Ideas That Spread Win

In an address to the Greater Baltimore Technology Council in 2006, author, entrepreneur, and marketing expert Seth Godin summed up the importance of marketing with a very simple phrase: “Ideas that spread, win.” Godin cites how one of the greatest inventions of all time, sliced bread, wouldn’t be anywhere without marketing. In fact, for about 17 years after it was invented, no one bought sliced bread. There was no market for it, and people didn’t know why they would need sliced bread. It took another company, the Taggart Baking Company in Indianapolis, to market the style and make it popular. Taggart’s original creation, Wonder Bread, is now produced by three separate companies in three different countries.

Can a “Green” Business Also Be a Profitable One?

While “going green” has been popular over the last decade, many businesses are still reluctant to switch over, fearing the cost of installing these systems outweighs the benefits. One YouTube video featuring Gary Hirshberg, president and CEO of organic food company Stonyfield Farm, explains how a business can go green and become environmentally responsible while still being profitable. Since going green 18 years ago, Hirshberg reports that Stonyfield Farm has grown over 24 percent annually the rest of the organic food industry, meanwhile, is only growing four percent annually. Hirshberg believes non-renewable energy is the most inflationary cost in society, and explains why every project presents an opportunity to practice sustainability and make a difference.

The Social Business Model

Bangladeshi economist Muhammad Yunus runs one of the few socially responsible banks in the world: Grameen Bank, which provides small loans to poor people and entrepreneurs with no collateral to help them become financially self-sufficient. Yunus, who also serves on the UN Foundation’s board of directors, describes how he created his social business model, and how others can create benevolent businesses of their own. Socially responsible businesses succeed because their bottom lines focus on others, rather than on profit alone Yunus believes this creates an incredible opportunity for start-ups in many destitute sectors, such as healthcare. “Should we leave everything to the decisions of the profit maximizers, so that their benefit is what decides the world?”

The Surprising Truth About What Motivates Us

How can you hire highly skilled workers, persuade them to work for free, and then release your product to the masses for free? It’s not impossible; in fact, several active companies such as Linux and Wikipedia has accomplished this feat. In this video, the Royal Society for the encouragement of Arts, Manufactures, and Commerce gives a comprehensive animated seminar on what motivates workers to work, and how to take advantage of that as a business. This video, which is animated entirely on a whiteboard, is extremely valuable, especially for those marketing and sales professionals. The animation is clean, clever, and imaginative, and illustrates the various studies and research used in this piece extremely well.

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